Golf Swing Basics: Understanding What Causes An “Over The Top” Golf

golf swing basicsI continue to be surprised about the lack of golf swing basics by some of the so-called top instructors in the world. I truly am amazed at the lack of golf swing basics by some of the so-called top instructors on the planet.

For example, I recently read an article in one of the golf magazines that swinging the club to the outside of the target line will cause you to come “over the top” during your downswing.

In other words, one of the top 100 instructors declared that taking the club to the outside of the shoulder/target line during your back swing will cause an out-to-in swing path at impact. This is not a winning golf method to avoid an “over the top” down swing.

It should cause you to swing on an in-to-out path during your downswing as long as you do not overly manipulate your golf club.

Certainly, the odds are against hitting the golf ball straight, whether on an out-to-in or in-to-out path of the club.

Here is why.

The instant you grip a golf club with an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip your wrists will rotate your clubface to an effective open alignment irrespective of how your clubface may appear to be aligned.

In addition, the very instant you grip a golf club with an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip, your elbow line—the imaginary line running across your elbows- will rotate to the inside of your shoulder line-the imaginary line running across your shoulders- to create an out-to-in swing path of your clubface.

The combination of an effective open alignment and an out-to-in swing path of your clubface will establish a slice ball flight alignment.

You can prove this anatomical phenomenon by following these simple golf swing instructions.

First, assume a comfortable stance and posture to your ball and then align your shoulders parallel with your target line. Do not move your feet after aligning your shoulders (shoulder line) with your target line.

Second, center the sweet spot of your clubface as near to the back of your ball as possible and then assume either an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip. Do not raise or lower your shoulders or arms after gripping your club. That is, maintain your spine angle.

Third, keep your head steady, your left heel planted and execute a regular golf swing without trying to manipulate your club in any way.

If you follow these golf swing instructions you should observe your ball flying initially to the inside of your shoulder/target line and then to the outside of your shoulder/target line in a slice configuration. It will be necessary for you to come “over the top” during your downswing in order for your clubface to contact the ball.

You simply would deliver an open clubface to your ball at impact on an out-to-in swing path across your shoulder/target line to produce a slice golf shot.

However, were you to follow the same steps as above and swing your clubface to the outside of your shoulder/target line during your backswing your swing path would change from out-to-in to in-to-out.

Then if you did not attempt to manipulate your club in some weird way during your downswing you would deliver your clubface to your ball on an in-to-out path across your shoulders and produce either a hook or  a push.

You definitely would not come “over the top” with such a swing—because of your in-to-out swing path during your downswing.

However, the slice ball flight alignment that is established the instant an overlapping, interlocking or baseball type of grip is assumed is not locked-in.

As a result, any body movement after initially assuming such a grip will cause the alignment and swing path of the clubface to change.

Thus, assuming several movements of the body, such as moving nearer or farther from the ball, raising or lowering the shoulders, flexing the knees up or down, etc., from the time the grip is assumed until the beginning of the backswing, a golfer will not know whether he or she has established an out-to-in, in-to-out or an online swing path at final address to the ball.

If your clubface rotated to an in-to-out swing path due to multiple body movements during your setup proceedings and then you were to swing your clubface to the outside of your shoulder/target line during your backswing, a non-manipulative forward swing would deliver an in-to-out swing path of your clubface at impact and you would produce either a hook or push-slice, depending on how much you swung your clubface to the outside.

You definitely would not come “over the top” in such an instance unless you were a contortionist.

So, generally speaking an outside the shoulder/target swing will usually rotate your elbow line to the outside of your shoulder line to create an in-to-out swing path of your clubface which will prevent an “over the top” downswing.

On the other hand, a typical inside the shoulder/target swing will rotate the elbow line to the inside of your shoulder/target line to create an out-to-in swing path which will require an “over the top” downswing in order for the clubface to make contact with the ball.

Why golf instructors, especially top 100 instructors, do not understand this these basic golf swing tips is beyond me.

When you lock-in the desired ball flight alignment you want during your setup routine, whether a fade, draw or to hit straight golf shots, with the instructions available at http://locked-ingolf.com and http://lockedingolfmethod.com, you impact position will replicate your address position and you will produce the precise ball flight you locked in without the necessity of swinging your club to the outside or to the inside of your shoulder/target line during your backswing.

Otherwise, it is nothing more than a guessing game as to whether you should swing your club to the inside. outside or straight back during your swing to produce the golf shot you want. It’s all a part of  the golf swing basics that so many instructors are unaware.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson. All Rights Reserved.     how to drive a golf ball straight

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Comments

  1. says

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